guyfarris:

TIPPI HEDREN IN “MARNIE” (1964)

guyfarris:

TIPPI HEDREN IN “MARNIE” (1964)

“About my appearing here at the conference: At first it did create a great deal of controversy, and, as you probably know, apprehension on the part of the powers that be in America, because they realize that if any direct contact, communication and understanding and working agreement are ever developed between the 22 million or 30 million Afro-Americans and the Africans here on the continent, there’s nothing we couldn’t accomplish.”
Malcolm X at the OAU conference: interview with Milton Henry.

Our problems are your problems. We have lived for over three hundred years in that American den of racist wolves in constant fear of losing life and limb. Recently, three students from Kenya were mistaken for American Negroes and were brutally beaten by the New York police. Shortly after that two diplomats from Uganda were also beaten by the New York City police, who mistook them for American Negroes.

If Africans are brutally beaten while only visiting in America, imagine the physical and psychological suffering received by your brothers and sisters who have lived there for over three hundred years.

Malcolm X addresses the Organization of African Unity in Cairo; July 17, 1964. (Text)

(Hat tip: Ed Brown, “Trayvon: A Pan African Perspective”, Pambazuka News, September 18, 2013)

weaselsrippedmybook:

We love Eartha Kitt, so we just had to share this photo spread from the July 1964 issue of Picture Scope. It was part of the promotional effort for her latest song at the time, "I Wanna Be Evil" And, damn! Who wouldn’t wanna get evil with Eartha?

weaselsrippedmybook:

We love Eartha Kitt, so we just had to share this photo spread from the July 1964 issue of Picture Scope. It was part of the promotional effort for her latest song at the time, "I Wanna Be Evil" And, damn! Who wouldn’t wanna get evil with Eartha?

collectivehistory:

The Harlem Riot of 1964

The Harlem Riot of 1964 (New York City Race Riot ) was a racial confrontation between residents in several city boroughs and the New York City Police after an African American teenager was shot dead by an off-duty police officer on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

On July 16, 15-year-old James Powell, from Harlem was shot and killed by NYPD Lieutenant Thomas Gilligan. The teenage summer student from Robert Wagner Junior High school had been engaged in horseplay with other boys and a building superintendent in front of an apartment building at 215 East 76th Street on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. When the man sprayed the boys with a hose, Powell grabbed a bottle to throw at the man. At this point Lt Gilligan, an off-duty cop who was passing by, saw what was happening and fired a warning shot. The boy lunged at Lt. Gilligan with a knife, cutting his right forearm. Lt. Gilligan then fired his service revolver twice at the boy. As news spread of the killing, a planned rally by CORE shifted from the three civil rights workers missing in Mississippi to the death of Powell and police brutality. 

At 9.30pm on 18 July, protesters marched on Harlem’s 28th Police Precinct. But they were met by a wall of ‘tactical police’, who began to push the demonstrators back from the building. Eventually the police charged the main group of protesters, sparking violent retaliation from the crowd. The crowd began to riot. The authorities closed 125th Street between Third and Eight Avenue but this did not stop the trouble spreading as hundreds of people fought with police.

Civil unrest lasted for more than five days with trouble spreading into Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. More than 6,000 police officers were deployed to quell the disorder. There were many violent incidents between police and residents. Stores were looted, people were beaten, and cars and buildings were set alight.

Source

historicaltimes:

1964 Malcolm X in Egypt

historicaltimes:

1964 Malcolm X in Egypt

soulbrotherv2:

A black protester being grabbed by police on Freedom Day in Greenwood, Mississippi.

For further reading and research, see also:
Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of 1964 That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy by Bruce Watson
Freedom Summer by Doug McAdam
Finding Freedom: Memorializing the Voices of Freedom Summer by Jacqueline Johnson
I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle by Charles Payne [This one is especially inspirational for those who wish to affect change.]


From Civil Rights Movement Veterans, “Freedom Summer”:

Freedom Day in Greenwood. Martha Lamb is the Registrar of Voters for Leflore County. She is notorious for her refusal to register Black voters. To dramatize her violation of Black voting rights and pressure her to obey Federal law, Federal court rulings, and the U.S. Constitution, July 16 is declared “Freedom Day” in Greenwood. For more than a week mass meetings and house-to-house canvassing urge Greenwood’s Black citizens to sign up as members in the MFDP and then attempt to register at the courthouse en masse on Freedom Day. To support those trying to register, and call attention to the denial of basic human rights in Mississippi, Black students eager for direct action are asked to peacefully picket the courthouse in violation of the state’s anti-picketing law — they know they will be arrested. Most of the summer volunteers want to join the line, but if everyone is in jail the main work of the project halts, so a limited number are chosen at random.
On July 16, the line of Black adults waiting to register stretches down the courthouse steps and around the corner. Only three at a time are allowed into the courthouse, the line crawls forward at a snail’s pace — most will not even reach the door. A swarm of local and state police harass and intimidate them, as do “deputized” toughs and furious white citizens.
The first wave of young pickets and summer volunteers walk single file along the sidewalk singing freedom songs. They are quickly arrested. Their “One Man/One Vote" and "End voting discrimination" signs are torn from their grasp and they are shoved into a police bus. Their singing intensifies: "Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me ‘round, turn me ‘round…" The pickets are staggered throughout the day, wave after wave are arrested, 111 in all, including 13 summer volunteers and some SNCC staff. Those arrested are sentenced to 30 days in jail and $100 fine. They go on hunger strike. After 6 days they are released on appeal bond of $200 each. The work of the project — voter registration, building the MFDP, Freedom Schools, and community organizing continues.

soulbrotherv2:

A black protester being grabbed by police on Freedom Day in Greenwood, Mississippi.

For further reading and research, see also:

Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of 1964 That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy by Bruce Watson

Freedom Summer by Doug McAdam

Finding Freedom: Memorializing the Voices of Freedom Summer by Jacqueline Johnson

I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle by Charles Payne [This one is especially inspirational for those who wish to affect change.]

From Civil Rights Movement Veterans, “Freedom Summer”:

Freedom Day in Greenwood. Martha Lamb is the Registrar of Voters for Leflore County. She is notorious for her refusal to register Black voters. To dramatize her violation of Black voting rights and pressure her to obey Federal law, Federal court rulings, and the U.S. Constitution, July 16 is declared “Freedom Day” in Greenwood. For more than a week mass meetings and house-to-house canvassing urge Greenwood’s Black citizens to sign up as members in the MFDP and then attempt to register at the courthouse en masse on Freedom Day. To support those trying to register, and call attention to the denial of basic human rights in Mississippi, Black students eager for direct action are asked to peacefully picket the courthouse in violation of the state’s anti-picketing law — they know they will be arrested. Most of the summer volunteers want to join the line, but if everyone is in jail the main work of the project halts, so a limited number are chosen at random.

On July 16, the line of Black adults waiting to register stretches down the courthouse steps and around the corner. Only three at a time are allowed into the courthouse, the line crawls forward at a snail’s pace — most will not even reach the door. A swarm of local and state police harass and intimidate them, as do “deputized” toughs and furious white citizens.

The first wave of young pickets and summer volunteers walk single file along the sidewalk singing freedom songs. They are quickly arrested. Their “One Man/One Vote" and "End voting discrimination" signs are torn from their grasp and they are shoved into a police bus. Their singing intensifies: "Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me ‘round, turn me ‘round…" The pickets are staggered throughout the day, wave after wave are arrested, 111 in all, including 13 summer volunteers and some SNCC staff. Those arrested are sentenced to 30 days in jail and $100 fine. They go on hunger strike. After 6 days they are released on appeal bond of $200 each. The work of the project — voter registration, building the MFDP, Freedom Schools, and community organizing continues.

lostslideshows:

"Pool Time" - 1964

lostslideshows:

"Pool Time" - 1964

American Indian land rights protests, July 1964

"Indians May Yet Win Back Some Lost Land: Claim 1887 Law Allows 160 Acres to Each From Vacant Property Held by Government" (Eric Malnic, Los Angeles Times, July 6, 1964)

If a federal court battle now pending in Oklahoma goes in favor of the plaintiff, and there are indications it will, American Indians may regain some sizeable chunks of the lands they lost so long ago.

The “chunks” in question would come from the 772 million acres of vacant public land in the United States—land which has yet to be settled upon or restricted for public use. […]

Not so, says the Bureau of Land Management, arguing that under rights granted them by a subsequent law bureau experts must classify any claim as “suitable for settlement” before an Indian can have it.

"Because most of the vacant land is arid, remote, desolate and unsuitable for farming," one bureau spokesman said, "very few pieces of land have or will be classified for settlement." […]

"No, it doesn’t make sense," Hopkins-Dukes countered.

"Admittedly, there is a lot of unfertile land, but not so much as the bureau would have you believe. A lot of it is being leased to lumber and cattle men, who make a good profit off that land."

The Land Rights spokesman pointed out that even if every one of the 500,000 U.S. Indians staked a 160-acre claim, they would require a little more than a 10th of the available land.

Land protest at the Bureau of Indian Affairs headquarters in Los Angeles, July 16, 1964 (Source)

"Indians Protest Government’s Land Policies" (Los Angeles Times, July 17, 1964)

More than 25 Indians and their supporters paraded in front of Bureau of Indian Affairs headquarters Thursday, protesting government land policies.

Some of the Indians wore tribal garb and carried placards criticizing Secretary of the Interior Steward Udall. One sign even intimated that Udall was a reincarnation of Gen. George Custer.

A. A. Hopkins-Dukes, a Kiowa Indian and executive secretary of the Tribal Indian Land Rights Assn., led the brief demonstration.

Hopkins-Dukes claimed an 1887 federal law allows every American Indian 160 acres of public land for the asking.

Demonstration at San Juan Capistrano Mission, July 18, 1964 (Source)

"Token Checks Sent Johnson: Indians Carrying On With Fight for Land" (Los Angeles Times, July 19)

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO—About 75 Jauneno Indians continued their fight Saturday with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and tried to get President Johnson into the act by sending him checks totaling $12.50 for 25 acres of public land. […]

"Now we want to play checkers with the Great White Father (Johnson) himself and not with his pony chiefs."

One of the signs the demonstrators carried said “Save Your Money, We Want Land.” It referred to a recent vote by Indians to accept $29.1 million for land Indians claim is theirs. Chief Lobo claims the election was “rigged.”